Entropion (eyelid rolling in)

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Entropion is a condition in which the eyelid is rolled inward toward the eye. It can occur as a result of advancing age and weakening of certain eyelid muscles or as a result of trauma, scarring or previous surgeries. Entropion may also occur in children.

What to Expect with This Condition

With Entropion, a turned-in eyelid rubs against the eye, making it red, irritated, painful and sensitive to light and wind, while also letting the wet inner eyelid surface be exposed and visible. While, normally, the upper and lower eyelids close tightly, protecting the eye from damage and preventing tear evaporation, if the edge of one eyelid turns outward, the two eyelids cannot meet properly and tears are not spread evenly over the eye.

Symptoms of Entropion

  • Excessive tearing
  • Chronic irritation
  • Redness
  • Pain
  • A gritty feeling
  • Crusting of the eyelid
  • Mucous discharge.

Why Treatment Is Necessary

If entropion exists, it is important to have a doctor repair the condition before permanent damage to the eye occurs.If the eyelid position is not treated, the condition can lead to excessive tearing, mucous discharge and scratching or scarring of the cornea. What’ s more, a chronically turned-in eyelid can result in severe sensitivity to light and may lead to eye infections, and even blindness

What to Expect from Entropion Treatment

Entropion can typically be repaired with a straightforward outpatient surgical procedure that takes less than 30 minutes. Most patients experience immediate resolution of the problem once surgery is completed with little, if any, post-operative discomfort. After the eyelid heals, the eye will feel comfortable and be protected from corneal scarring, infection and loss of vision.

What to Expect after Entropion Treatment

Recovery after surgery generally is associated with moderate swelling and bruising and minimal discomfort.  The majority of bruising and swelling resolves within the first two weeks after most eyelid surgeries.